Philippines Conditional Cash Transfer Program Impact Evaluation 2012

Source:  DSWD Philippines The World Bank’s impact evaluation of the Philippines CCT Pantawid Pamilya Program shows:

1. Overall, the program is meeting its objective of helping to keep poor children in school, by increasing enrollment among younger children (3-11 years old) and increasing attendance among 6-17 year olds.

2. However, the findings suggest that the program has not had a significant impact on increasing enrollment among older children aged 12-17 years old.

3. The program was found to be meeting its objective of helping to keep poor children healthy.

4. The program is also achieving its objective of enabling poor households to increase their investments in meeting the health and education needs of their children.

5. Although the study found that the cash grants were reaching beneficiaries, the study did not find an overall increase in per capita consumption among the poor benefiting from the program, although there was some evidence that poor households are saving more in certain provinces.

6. Pantawid Pamilya has had positive impacts beyond its originally targeted objectives. For example, the program has contributed to increased coverage of the PhilHealth health insurance program.

7. The program has not affected decisions to work or fertility rates.

8. Although the sampling was not designed to be statistically representative at the provincial level, the findings suggest that program impacts differ by province.

9. Although the impact evaluation found evidence of success on a broad range of outcomes, the results also revealed a number of challenges for Pantawid Pamilya going forward. To achieve overall improvements in education and health outcomes, however, the study findings highlight the need to intensify efforts to improve access to and quality of health and education services for CCT beneficiaries.

The complete World Bank report here.

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