Pyjama diplomacy

So… I was not mistaken with what I thought about the news, which until President Obama’s recent joke about the event dwelt on cute Prince George in pyjamas and dressing gown who stayed up past his bedtime so he could be part of the welcoming party, details of his monogrammed bathrobe said to be surely copied again by the rest of the world, and details inside the Kensington Palace’ apartment said to lack the opulence expected of royals which meant less maintenance expense to English taxpayers.

What I noticed were the underlying themes in the otherwise well-meaning greeting between Prince George and President Obama:

(1) Power. An outgoing President of a republican nation, the most powerful on earth today, making an official visit to a long-time ally, a Prince, third in line to the throne, who greets him in his bedclothes, the monogram on it could’ve read oh, bother! calling on me at this hour eh?— for this meeting’s many significances the Prince’ dress code really does feel “like a (royal) slap on the (commoner’s) face”.

(2) Manners. History and biography books say that English kings and queens take care to dress for the occasion. Was the young Prince’ dressing gown moment a lapse in English manners? Or, a sampling of British humor? Hmmm…

(3) Race/Color. The impact’s more so when one’s black. Prince George’ parents purportedly hid the word ‘negro’ from a painting in their apartment, and while successful, somebody forgot to efface the pun in the white bathrobe. “Black enough” for you, Mr. Balack, sir? Sir?

These made me think about our own dealings with China over the South China Sea / West Philippine Sea. What is that brilliant move which would soften China to us on that matter? Ha! As if?

Anyway.

Imagine the daily horrors, intentional or not, the politico’s wife has to witness and endure although on the positive side these things school one in the art of maintaining dignity in all things which soon inevitably develops into a happy steeliness. That or collapse at the slightest of remarks. In any case, one can always laugh the whole thing off, or attend to that carrot patch.

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